Native American Family Involvement Day

Khaloni Freemont, editor

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They only get this day to be involved. They should also be appreciated.

Native American family involvement day was Tuesday, November 15, 2016.  This event was for the Native American students, parents, and faculty members to have fun and build new relationships. At this event, they made medicine ties, did screen printing, and made a banner. They are sending these things to the Dakota Pipeline protesters in North Dakota.  

The medicine ties are meant to bring good luck. The students and their families put in traditional tobacco, cedar, sweetgrass, and sage. These are the four sacred medicines.  The way to make them is to take a red cloth, and put the four medicines in it. Afterwards you tie it up with a strand of red cloth. While they do this, they are saying a prayer for everything they are thankful for or what they want or who they want to be healed.

The screen printing was to make beautiful posters that say “No Pipeline on Indigenous Land.” Many posters were made. Students delivered them to their teachers. Teachers gladly accepted them and hung them up in their classrooms.

The banner the students, parents, and faculty made is going to the Standing Rock reservation, the site of the protest, along with the medicine ties. The banner was designed by Lauren Mckensie, a Roosevelt Teddy sophomore. The banner reads “Roosevelt stands w/ standing rock,”.  There is a medicine wheel with the traditional colors; red, yellow, black, and white. While those colors were painted, there is a bear paw to represent the Roosevelt Teddies. The medicine wheel colors each represent a different season, medicine, age group, and state of health.

The wheel begins with yellow which signifies mental health, the East, the sacred medicine tobacco, the season of Spring, and the age group of birth/childhood.

Red is the direction of south. Also it signifies physical health. The sacred medicine is sweet grass, and the season is summer. The age group in this direction is youth/adolescence.

Now the west. The color for west is blue or black. The sacred medicine is sage, the season is autumn, the age range is adulthood to parents. And in this direction is emotional health.

The last direction is north. The sacred medicine is cedar. This is for spiritual health. The age range is elders. The season is winter. This is the section of spiritual health.

The families who came showed the love they have to support both their kids and their culture. They had a traditional meal of wild rice soup with fry bread. Fry bread really isn’t a traditional food, its just incorporated it into Native Americans’ meals. As teens and parents were painting, there was a great deal of positive conversation and interaction. You could obviously feel there was positive energy going around.

The Native American Community wants to give a big thank you to the Native American planning committee at RHS:

  • Lauren Mckensie, sophomore
  • Theresa Defoe, freshman
  • Rosa Adan, freshman
  • Ms. Nordby, science teacher
  • Ms. Gonzales, staff
  • Mr. Gonzales, staff
  • Khaloni Freemont, freshman
  • Shy Thunderhawk, sophomore

They would also like to thank Tiahna Lumbar, freshman student, and Jordan Dunkley, freshman student, for helping out during the event, Miskwa Derjarait, Native American staff, for setting up this event, and Mike Forcia  for providing the food.

 

 

2 Comments

2 Responses to “Native American Family Involvement Day”

  1. Smitha812 on March 10th, 2017 8:21 am

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